Engaging children with artists who look like them, have similar experiences, and come from similar backgrounds is a great source of inspiration and empowerment. By reflecting their own identities, experiences and motivations (mirrors) and also providing insight into the identities, experiences and motivations of others (windows) can move students toward more nuanced perceptions of the world around them (sliding glass doors).*  Discover new BIPOC artists to add to your curriculum.


*Source: By Rudine Sims Bishop, The Ohio State University. "Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors"
This is a evolving and growing resource. If you have any suggestions or would like to recommend additional artists, please e-mail us at antiracistartteachers@gmail.com We thank you for your collaboration!

Pacific Islander & SouthEast Asian Artists

Artists listed in alphabetical order by first/preferred name.

Artists have many layered identities and art educators need to present them as such.


Representing diverse artists in your curriculum is only part of an Anti-Bias, Anti-Racist curriculum. It needs to be more than a symbolic effort and art educators need to take into account intersectionality when introducing these artists to students. How do aspects of an artists’ social and political identities (ex. gender, sex, race, class, sexuality, religion, ability, physical appearance, etc.) intersect within their work?
In addition, we recognize that race is socially constructed and it is impossible to put humans in clearly defined categories by race. Racial identity is deeply personal, and artists within any given subgroup define themselves differently. Race, ethnicity, and nationality are all factors artist's individually consider as their personal identity. However, as mentioned previously that is not all that there is to their identity. We know that artists have many layered identities and art educators need to do the research to present them as such. These groupings are not perfect, as humans are not meant to be divided into boxes. We hope this resource can help art educators identify who is missing from their curriculum in order to create a curriculum more representative of the incredible diversity among students and artists today.

A

Affandi
Indonesian

Albert Namatjira
Australian Aboriginal (MacDonnell Ranges)

Aline Amaru
Tahitian

Amanda Heng
Singaporean

Ang Song Nian
Singaporean

Angki Purbandono Indonesian

An-My Lê
Vietnamese

Anna Kim
Filipino

Aung Ko
Burmese

Aung Myint
Burmese

Aye Ko
Burmese


B

C

Chatchawan Amsomkid
Thai

Chaw Ei Thein
Burmese

Cheanick Nov
Cambodian

Christine Ay Tjoe
Indonesian

D

Darryn George
New Zealander
(Ngāpuhi descent)

Dex Fernandez
Filipino

Dina Chhan
Cambodian

Dolorosa Sinaga
Indonesian

Dexter Sy
Filipino




E

Eko Nugroho
Indonesian

Elmer Misa Borlongan Filipino

Ernest Concepcion
Filipino


F

Fadjar Sidik
Indonesian

Fatu Akelei Feu'u
Samoan

FX Harsono
Indonesian


G

Gloria Petyarre Australian Aboriginal (Anmatyerre)

Gordon Walters
New Zealander (Māori)

Griselda Sastrawinata-Lemay
Indonesian


H

Handrio
Indonesian

Heri Dono
Indonesian

Htein Lin
Burmese


I

Irami Buli
Fijian

Itiri Ngaro
Cook Islander



J

Jason Dow
Hawaiian

Jeremy Enecio
Filipino

Jirapat Tatsanasomboon
Thai

Jittagarn Kaewtinkoy
Thai

John Clang
Singaporean

John Pule
Niuean

Jorna Newberry
Pitjantjatjara


K

Kalisolaite ‘Uhila
Tongan

Kamea Hadar
Hawaiian

Kawayan de Guia
Filipino

Kritsana Chaikitwattana
Thai

Kudditji Kngwarreye Australian Aboriginal (Utopia)




L

Lambert Ho
Fijian

Leeroy New
Filipino



M

Mark Chai
Hawaiian

Mark Kushimi
Hawaiian

Maile Andrade Hawaiian

Martha Atienza
Dutch and Filipino

Matthew Tapia
Hawaiian

Maitree Siriboon
Thai

Manit Sriwanichpoom
Thai

Michel Rangie
Vanuatuan

Moe Satt
Burmese

Mulyana
Indonesian



N

Neil Pasilan
Filipino

I Nyoman Masriadi
Indonesian

Nguyen Thi Chau Giang Vietnamese

Nge Lay
Burmese

Nyein Chan Su
Burmese




O

Oscar Villamiel
Filipino




P

Paratene Matchitt
New Zealander (Māori)

Patricia Perez Eustaquio
Filipino

Patrick Cabral
Filipino

Paula Schaafhausen Samoan

Phan Quang
Vietnamese

Peter Robinson
New Zealander (Māori)

Po Po
Burmese


Q-R

Ralph Hotere
New Zealander (Māori)

Rattana Salee
Thai

Robert Zhao Renhui
Singaporean

Robyn Kahukiwa
New Zealander (Māori)

Ronald Ventura
Filipino

Reniel Del Rosario
Filipino American



S

Sarah Choo Jing
Singaporean

Sareth Svay
Cambodian

Selwyn Muru
New Zealander (Māori)

Stephanie Syjuco Filipino

Soe Yu Nwe
Burmese




T

Therdkiat Wangwatcharakul
Thai




U-V

Vandy Rattana
Cambodian

Vasan Sitthiket
Thai



W-X-Y-Z

Wah Nu and
Tun Win Aung
Burmese Couple

Wooden Wave (Team)
Hawaiian



Discover More

Myanmar Contemporary Art

Art Asia Pacific

@artasiapacific

Pacific Island Artists Connection

Cambodian Living Arts

Filipino/American Artist Directory



Aboriginal: inhabiting or existing in a land from the earliest times or from before the arrival of colonists.

Pacific Islanders, or Pasifika, are the peoples of the Pacific Islands. It is a geographic and ethnic/racial term to describe the inhabitants and diaspora of any of the three major sub-regions of Oceania. It is not used to describe non-indigenous inhabitants of the Pacific islands. The Pacific islands consist of three main regions:

Polynesia: The islands are scattered across a triangle covering the east-central region of the Pacific Ocean.
The triangle is bound by the Hawaiian Islands in the north, New Zealand in the west, and Easter Island in
the east. The rest of Polynesia includes the Samoan islands (American Samoa and Western Samoa), the
Cook Islands, French Polynesia (Tahiti and The Society Islands, Marquesas Islands, Austral Islands, and
the Tuamotu Archipelago), Niue Island, Tokelau and Tuvalu, Tonga, Wallis and Futuna, Rotuma Island,
Pitcairn Island, Nukuoro, and Kapingamarangi.

Melanesia: The island of New Guinea, the Bismarck and Louisiade archipelagos, the Admiralty Islands,
Bougainville Island, Papua New Guinea, Western New Guinea (part of Indonesia), Aru Islands, the
Solomon Islands, the Santa Cruz Islands (part of the Solomon Islands), New Caledonia and Loyalty Islands,
Vanuatu (formerly New Hebrides), Fiji, Norfolk Island and various smaller islands.

Micronesia: Kiribati, Nauru, the Marianas (Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands),
the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Palau, and the Federated States of Micronesia (Yap, Chuuk, Pohnpei,
and Kosrae, all in the Caroline Islands).


Southeast Asia or Southeastern Asia is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the regions that are geographically south of China, east of the Indian subcontinent and north-west of Australia. In contemporary definition, Southeast Asia consists of two geographic regions:

Mainland Southeast Asia, also known historically as Indochina, comprising Cambodia, Laos,
Myanmar, Peninsular Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam.

Maritime Southeast Asia, also known historically as Nusantara, the East Indies, or the Malay
Archipelago, comprising the Andaman and Nicobar Islands (India), Ashmore and Cartier Islands
(Australia), Brunei, Christmas Island (Australia), the Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Australia), East Malaysia,
East Timor, Indonesia (except Western New Guinea, which is considered a part of the Oceania), the
Philippines and Singapore.