Engaging children with artists who look like them, have similar experiences, and come from similar backgrounds is a great source of inspiration and empowerment. By reflecting their own identities, experiences and motivations (mirrors) and also providing insight into the identities, experiences and motivations of others (windows) can move students toward more nuanced perceptions of the world around them (sliding glass doors).*  Discover new BIPOC artists to add to your curriculum.


*Source: By Rudine Sims Bishop, The Ohio State University. "Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors"
This is a evolving and growing resource. If you have any suggestions or would like to recommend additional artists, please e-mail us at antiracistartteachers@gmail.com We thank you for your collaboration!

LatinX Artists

Artists listed in alphabetical order by first/preferred name.

Artists have many layered identities and art educators need to present them as such.


Representing diverse artists in your curriculum is only part of an Anti-Bias, Anti-Racist curriculum. It needs to be more than a symbolic effort and art educators need to take into account intersectionality when introducing these artists to students. How do aspects of an artists’ social and political identities (ex. gender, sex, race, class, sexuality, religion, ability, physical appearance, etc.) intersect within their work?
In addition, we recognize that race is socially constructed and it is impossible to put humans in clearly defined categories by race. Racial identity is deeply personal, and artists within any given subgroup define themselves differently. Race, ethnicity, and nationality are all factors artist's individually consider as their personal identity. However, as mentioned previously that is not all that there is to their identity. We know that artists have many layered identities and art educators need to do the research to present them as such. These groupings are not perfect, as humans are not meant to be divided into boxes. We hope this resource can help art educators identify who is missing from their curriculum in order to create a curriculum more representative of the incredible diversity among students and artists today.

A

Abdias do Nascimento
Brazilian

Adal Maldonado
Puerto Rican

Alan Pelaez Lopez AfroIndigenous Mexican

Alán Serna
Mexican

Alex Da Corte
American Venezuelan

Aliza Nisenbaum
Mexican

Andrea Pérez Bessin
Puerto Rican

Angel Otero
Puerto Rican

Antonio Maldonado
Puerto Rican

Antonio Martorell
Puerto Rican

Arturo Herrera
Venezuelan

Augusto Marín
Puerto Rican

Antuco Chicaiza
Ecuadorian

Arthur Gonzalez
American

Alejandro Macias
Mexican American


B

Beatriz Cortez
Salvadorian

Beatriz Milhazes
Brazilian

Belkis Ayón
Cuban

Broobs
Chicanx

C

Carla Fernández
Mexican

Carmen Argote
Mexican American

Carmen Herrera
Cuban

Carmen Lomas Garza
Chicana

Carlos Mercado
Puerto Rican

Carolina Caycedo
Col
ombian

Carolyn Castaño
Colombian American

Chemi Rosado-Seijo
Puerto Rican

Clarissa Tossin
Brazilian

Cognate Collective
Mexican American

Carol Rossetti
Brazilian

Christina Erives
Mexican Heritage

Criselda Vasquez
Mexican-American




D

Damián Ortega
Mexican

Daniela Garcia
1st generation Mexican American/Latina

Diego Rivera
Mexican

Doris Salcedo
Colombian

E

Eduardo Kobra
Brazilian

Elia Alba
Dominican American

Elizabeth Barreto
Puerto Rican

Elle Pérez
Puerto Rican

Emanuel Martinez
Mexican American

Ernesto Neto
Brazilian

Ester Hernandez
Chicana


F

Farid Rueda
Mexican

Firelei Báez
Dominican

Frida Kahlo
Mexican

Francis Robateau
Belizean American

Freddy Rodríguez
Dominican

Favianna Rodriguez
American



G

Gabi Pérez-Silver
Puerto Rican

Gabriel Orozco
Mexican

Gabriel Dawe
Mexican

Garvin Sierra
Puerto Rican

Guadalupe Maravilla Salvadorean

George Rodriguez
Mexican American

Gabriel García Román
Mexican-Amaricón


H

Hoesy Corona
Mexican

Humberto Ramos
Mexican



I

J

J. Leigh Garcia
Biracial Latina

Read Interview Here

Jacqueline Valenzuela
Mexican-American

Jaime Romano
Puerto Rican

Jean-Michel Basquiat
Haitian/Puerto Rican

Jesse Treviño
Mexican American

Jesus Treviño
Mexican American

José R. Alicea
Puerto Rican

Jorge Soto Sánchez
Puerto Rican

José Antonio Torres Martino
Puerto Rican

José Guadalupe Posada Mexican

José A. Rosa Castellanos
Puerto Rican

Joiri Minaya
Dominican-United Statesian

Juan Sánchez
Puerto Rican

Julio Salgado
Mexican

Justin Favela
Guatemala-Mexican-American

Judith Francisca Baca
American Chicana

José Braulio Bedia Valdés
Cuban

Juana Valdes
Cuban


K

Karlito Miller Espinosa
Costa Rican

Kukuli Velarde
Peruvian



L

Larry Fuente
American

Leopoldo Méndez
Mexican

Liliana Porter
Argentinian

Lilliam Nieves
Puerto Rican

Lorena Cruz
Mexican-American

Luis Jiménez
Mexican American

Lourdes Jiménez Mexican American

Lucía Méndez Rivas
Dominican

M

Marco Hernandez
Mexican

Marco Sánchez
Mexicano

María Magdalena Campos-Pons
Cuban

Matthew Willie Garcia
Hispanic

Marela Zacarías
Mexican

Mario Eduardo Testino Peruvian

Melanie Cervantes
Xicana

Melesio Casas
Chicano

Myrna Báez
Puerto Rican

Morel Doucet
Haitian American

Manuel Mendive
Afro-Cuban

Maria Amalia
Honduran

N

Nick Quijano
Puerto Rican

Natalia Arbelaez
Colombian American



O

Olga Albizu
Puerto Rican




P

Patssi Valdez
Chicana

Paula Liz
Puerto Rican

Pepón Osorio
Puerto Rican

Pedro Reyes
Mexican

Priscilla Monge
Costa Rican




Q

R

Rafael López del Campo
Puerto Rican

Rafa Esparza
Mexican American

Rafael Soriano
Cuban

Raphael Montañez Ortiz
Yaqui-Puerto Rican


Raúl de Nieves
Mexican

Rachelle Mozman Solano
Panamanian

Raquel Gutiérrez
Queer

Ricardo Jaén
Panamanian American

Roberto Lugo
Puerto Rican

Rodríguez Calero
Puerto Rican

Ronny Quevedo Ecuadorean

Roberto Gutierrez
Chicano

Robert Vargas
Mexican-American

Rosenda Alvarez Faro
Puerto Rican



S

Salvador Jiménez-Flores
Mexican

Scherezade García
Dominican

Sofia Maldonado
Puerto Rican

Suzy González
Xicana

Sara Barriera
Mexican & Puerto Rican




T

Tanya Aguiñiga
Mexican American

Tarsila do Amaral
Brazilian

Teresita De La Torre
Mexican

Teresita Fernández
Cuban

Tony Aguero
Costa Rican

Tony Bechara
Puerto Rican

Tony Capellán
Dominican

Teresa Burga
Peruvian

U

V

Victoria Villasana
Mexican

Vik Muniz
Brazilian

Voluspa Jarpa Saldías
Chilean

Vick Quezada
Mexican American

W

William Camargo
Chicanx

Wence Martinez
Mexican (Zapotec Heritage)

William Cordova
Peruvian

Wendi Ruth Valladares
Mexican American

X

Xochi Solis
Mexican American




Y

Yreina D. Cervántez
Chicana

Yvette Mayorga
Mexican American



Z

Discover More

The National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures

Latin American Art

Latin American and Caribbean Art from the MoMA Collection

Art of the Americas

El Museo del Barrio

@elmuseo

Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico

Arte Américas

Amerindians: The indigenous population of Latin America.

Boricua: a Puerto Rican, or person of Puerto Rican descent. It is also the name Puerto Rico's indigenous Indians, the Taino, gave to their island.

ChicanX: a Mexican American (can be used in place of the masculine, feminine and gender binary form).

Hispanic and Latino are often used interchangeably though they actually mean two different things. Hispanic refers to people who speak Spanish and/or are descended from Spanish-speaking populations, while Latino refers to people who are from or descended from people from Latin America.

Latin American: relating to or characteristic of Latin America or its inhabitants.

LatinX: a person of Latin origin or descent.

Latin America is a group of countries and dependencies in the Western Hemisphere where Romance languages such as Spanish, Portuguese, and French are predominantly spoken. It is broader than the terms Ibero-America or Hispanic America in categorizing the New World. The term comes from the fact that the predominant languages of the countries originated with the Latin language. Latin America consists of 20 countries and 14 dependent territories that cover an area that stretches from Mexico to Tierra del Fuego and includes much of the Caribbean. It includes more than 20 nations: Mexico in North America; Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama in Central America; Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, French Guiana, Paraguay, Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay in South America; Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Puerto Rico in the Caribbean.

Xicanismo: transcends a label of being Mexican or Mexican American. The “X” connects the person to a recognition of their indigenous identity that is often overlooked by many Mexicans. This identity of Xicanismo reclaims indigenaity by using the “X” which is commonly used for the “ch” sound in indigenous languages.