Engaging children with artists who look like them, have similar experiences, and come from similar backgrounds is a great source of inspiration and empowerment. By reflecting their own identities, experiences and motivations (mirrors) and also providing insight into the identities, experiences and motivations of others (windows) can move students toward more nuanced perceptions of the world around them (sliding glass doors).*  Discover new BIPOC artists to add to your curriculum.


*Source: By Rudine Sims Bishop, The Ohio State University. "Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors"
This is a evolving and growing resource. If you have any suggestions or would like to recommend additional artists, please e-mail us at antiracistartteachers@gmail.com We thank you for your collaboration!

Black Artists

Artists listed in alphabetical order by first/preferred name.

Artists have many layered identities and art educators need to present them as such.


Representing diverse artists in your curriculum is only part of an Anti-Bias, Anti-Racist curriculum. It needs to be more than a symbolic effort and art educators need to take into account intersectionality when introducing these artists to students. How do aspects of an artists’ social and political identities (ex. gender, sex, race, class, sexuality, religion, ability, physical appearance, etc.) intersect within their work?
In addition, we recognize that race is socially constructed and it is impossible to put humans in clearly defined categories by race. Racial identity is deeply personal, and artists within any given subgroup define themselves differently. Race, ethnicity, and nationality are all factors artist's individually consider as their personal identity. However, as mentioned previously that is not all that there is to their identity. We know that artists have many layered identities and art educators need to do the research to present them as such. These groupings are not perfect, as humans are not meant to be divided into boxes. We hope this resource can help art educators identify who is missing from their curriculum in order to create a curriculum more representative of the incredible diversity among students and artists today.

A

Aaron Douglas
American

Abe Odedina
Nigerian

Adia Millett
American

Adde Adesokan
German / Nigerian

Adrian Brandon
American

Afewerk Tekle
Ethiopian

Aïda Muluneh
Ethiopian

Alyssia Gibson
American

Alexandria Smith
British

Alice Beasley
American

Alma Woodsey Thomas
American

Amir Abdul-Shakur
American (Black)

Amy Sherald
American

Angela Pilgrim
American

Andrea Chung
American

Angelica Dass
Brazilian

Anna Jane McIntyre
Canadian

Andrea Pippins
Swedish

Ashanté Kindle
American

Asuka Anastacia Ogawa
Japanese-Brazilian

Augusta Savage
American

Aurélia Durand
American



B

Barkley L Hendricks
American

Barry Johnson
American

Benny Andrews
American

Bayeté Ross Smith
American

Betye Saar
American

Bisa Butler
American

Brandan “BMike” Odums
American

Bee Harris
American

C

Carrie Mae Weems
American

Cauleen Smith
American

Cbabi Bayoc
American

Read Interview Here

Charles Alston
American

Chakaia Booker
American

Charles White
American

Clementine Hunter
American

Ciara LeRoy
American

Christo Musinguzi
Ugandan




D

David Driskell
American

David Hammons
American

Dawoud Bey
American

Delfin Finley
American

Delita Martin
American

Didier William
Haitian

Derrick Adams
American

Deana Lawson
American

Délio Jasse
Angolan

Dissirama
Ghanaian



E

Ebony G. Patterson
Jamaican

El Anatsui
Ghanaian

Emma Amos
American

Ejatu Shaw
British

Ekua Holmes
American

Ernie Barnes
American

Elizabeth Catlett
American & Mexican

Ellis Wilson
American

Emory Douglas
American

Eliana Rodgers
American



F

Faith Ringgold
American

Francis Robateau
Belizean American

Frank Bowling
Guyanan/British

Frank Morrison
American

Fred Wilson
American




G

Glenn Ligon
American

Gordon Parks
American

Gerald A. Brown
American


H

Hale Woodruff
American

Hamilton Glass
American

Hank Willis Thomas
American

Harold D. Smith Jr.
American

Hebru Brantley
American

Henry Ossawa Tanner
American

Horace Pippin
American

Howardena Pindell
American

Hippy Potter
American




I

Iona Rozeal Brown
American

Ibrahim el-Salahi
Sudanese



J

Jack Whitten
American

Jacob Lawrence
American

Jacolby Satterwhite
American

Jade Purple Brown
American

Jalondra Quvon
American

Jen Hewett
American

Jessi Raulet
American

Jibade-Khalil Huffman
American

Jean-Michel Basquiat
Haitian/Puerto Rican

Jennifer Mack-Watkins
American

Jessica Spence
Jamaican-American

Johnson Eziefula
Nigerian

Jordan Casteel
American

Jonelle James
Guyanese & Jamaican

Joiri Minaya
Dominican-United Statesian

Julie Mehretu
Ethiopian

Jamel Shabazz
African American

Joyce J. Scott
African American

Jamaal Barber
American

Jeanette Ehlers
Danish-Trinidadian


Jackie Ormes
American




K

Kara Walker
American

Kayla Mahaffey
American

Kadir Nelson
American

Kay Brown
American

Kay Douglas
American

Kerry James Marshall
American

Kenyatta AC Hinkle
American


Kehinde Wiley
American

Kesha Bruce
American

Kevin Kabue
Kenyan

Kevin Spines
American

Kimmy Cantrell
American

Kori Newkirk
American




L

Laci Jordan
American

LaKela Brown
American

Lakwena Maciver
British

LaToya Hobbs
American

Laylah Ali
American

Lavaughan Jenkins

American

Leslie Diuguid
American

Lina Iris Viktor
British-Liberian

Lois Mailou Jones
American

Lorna Simpson
American

LaToya Ruby Frazier
American

La Vaughn Belle
Virgin Islands


M

Madelyn Sneed Grays
American

Malaya Lalog
American

Malcolm Mobutu Smith
American

Mark Bradford
American

Martin Puryear
American

Mary Edmonia Lewis
American

Mickalene Thomas
American

Michael C. Thorpe
American

Michael Zeray
African American

Moe Brooker
American

Marlon Riggs
American

Magdalene Odundo
Kenyan, British

Manuel Mendive
Afro-Cuban

Mia Saine
American

Mimi Moffie
Dutch


N

Nadine Robinson
Jamaican

Natasha Cunningham
Jamaican

Nick Cave
American

Nicholle Kobi
French

Njideka Akunyili Crosby
Nigerian American

Norman Lewis
American

Nontsikelelo ‘Lolo’ Veleko
South African

Nathan Murray
American

Natasha Nayo
Ghanaian

Nina Chanel Abney
American

Noah Purifoy
American


O

Odili Donald Odita
Nigerian




P

Palmer Hayden
American

Paul Andrew Wandless
American

Pierre Santos
British

Prince Gyasi Nyantakyi
Ghanaian

Paul Briggs
American



Q

Queenbe Moneyi
American




R

Rashid Johnson
American

Rashod Taylor
American

Reggie Laurent
American

Romare Bearden
American

Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze
Nigerian-British

Renee Cox
Jamaican-American

Rashid Diab
Sudanese


S

Sam Gilliam
American

Simone Saunders
Jamaican European

Stanley Whitney
American

Stephen Wiltshire
British

Stephanie Santana
American

Stephen Marc
American

Sharee Miller
American

Shanée Benjamin
American

Sharon Norwood
Canadian, Jamaican, American

Simone Leigh
American



T

Tawny Chatmon
American

Temi Coker
Nigerian

Tiffany Thomas
American

Titus Kaphar
American

Tre Crews
American

Tyree Guyton
American

Taylor McManus
American

Tanekeya Word
American

Thomas J. Price
British

Toyin Ojih Odutola
American-Nigerian

Thornton Dial
African-American


U

V

Vanessa German
American

Vashti Harrison
American

Veronica Ryan
American


W

Wangechi Mutu
Kenyan

Wayde McIntosh
American

Willard Wigan
British

William Johnson
American

Woody De Othello American




X-Y

Xenobia Bailey
African-American

Yinka Shonibare
British-Nigerian

Yinka Orafidiya
American

Yung Jake
American

Z

Zanele Muholi
South African

Zipporah Camille Thompson
American



Discover More

A resource of 500+ Black artists

This site features Black creatives worldwide

Black Art in America

A Twitter Directory of Accomplished Black Designers

@blackartistspace

@youngblackartists

@blackwomen
invisualart

@blackwomenofprint

Souls Grown Deep Foundation Artists

The Self-Taught American Painter Horace Pippin Has Long Been Overlooked by Museums and the Market. Here’s Why That Should Change



Africa: the continent that is to the south of the Mediterranean Sea, to the east of the Atlantic Ocean, and to the west of the Indian Ocean. There are 54 countries in Africa today, according to the United Nations. These include: Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Camoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

African: relating to Africa or people of African descent.

African-American: an ethnic group of Americans with total or partial ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa. Used to describe ethnicity while Black often describes race. (For example, Black people who live in America but are from other parts of the world other than Africa may not identify as African-American. However, those factions of people may still consider ‘Black’ to be their identity.)

Black: of or relating to any of various population groups having dark pigmentation of the skin or ancestry originating in Africa.

Ethnicity: a group of people who identify with one another with similarities such as history, culture, language, ancestry, etc.

Race: a group of people who share cultural elements such as language, history, etc.